Volpin's Top Tip #6 - Rust

This is pretty simple: use real rust. I use Matisse brand ferrous powder (make sure its gray; red means oxidized already and it won't rust properly)

Dust a bit of this onto water-dampened places of your prop to get it to stay in place, then follow up with a few spritzes of rust accelerator in a spray bottle. My own personal recipe is:

• 10 parts hydrogen peroxide
• 10 parts vinegar
• 2 parts lemon juice
• 1 part salt

I call it "Hamster Pee" and if you mix up a batch you'll know why. Varying the amount of peroxide or vinegar will tint your rust more blue/purple or yellow/orange. Leave it overnight to cure and it'll be rusty crusty by morning!

Pasted Graphic 6

Disclaimer: These top tips have been posted here without the expressed permission of Volpin (AKA Harrison Krix). If you would like to view more of Volpin’s work, his website is http://www.volpinprops.com and don’t forget to check out is Facebook Page to keep up to date with his ongoing projects. Harrison, if you’re reading this and you would like these removed, please get in touch.
Comments

Volpin's Top Tip #5 - Gun Metal Effect

Another tip from the archives! This is a technique for a gunmetal texture with a bit of depth.

This was borrowed from a builder named Matsuo over on the RPF, and modified a bit for my project. The base paint on this casting is flat black. I took a piece of cotton cloth from an old pair of khakis and rubbed a stick of graphite (HB) across the whole surface of the fabric. This was then used to buff the flat paint and give it a slight metallic sheen.

If you end up with something a bit too silvery don't worry, a coat of flat clear will dull the finish somewhat and leave you with more black than silver. You can repeat this process over subsequent clearcoats to bring out more silver and depth.

Pasted Graphic 5

Disclaimer: These top tips have been posted here without the expressed permission of Volpin (AKA Harrison Krix). If you would like to view more of Volpin’s work, his website is http://www.volpinprops.com and don’t forget to check out is Facebook Page to keep up to date with his ongoing projects. Harrison, if you’re reading this and you would like these removed, please get in touch.
Comments

Volpin's Top Tip #4 - Decals

Today's tip is about decals! If you've ever made a model car you've seen water-slide decals. You can buy specific water decal paper for inkjet and laser printers for use on your props - just make sure to clearcoat the inkjet ones, since the ink can run if it gets damp. I used water slide decals on the yellow cell on the right in this shot.

For the forward decals on this gun, the water slide wouldn't work - printing yellow on clear over a dark base won't show up at all. Instead, I scanned a painted green surface and designed the decal over that scanned image, then printed the result onto white sticker paper. Bit of weathering and it blends right in.

Pasted Graphic 4

Disclaimer: These top tips have been posted here without the expressed permission of Volpin (AKA Harrison Krix). If you would like to view more of Volpin’s work, his website is http://www.volpinprops.com and don’t forget to check out is Facebook Page to keep up to date with his ongoing projects. Harrison, if you’re reading this and you would like these removed, please get in touch.
Comments

Volpin's Top Tip #3 - Forming Resin Parts Mid-Cure

When making certain armor parts or accessories, using a slower setting resin will allow you to manipulate the shape of a cast piece. This arm cuff was sculpted and molded flat, then removed while the resin was "set" (changed color and no longer tacky) but not fully cured to its final hardness.

By taking the flexible piece and wrapping it around a pipe to fully cure, a round arm cuff was able to be created from a very simple flat mold.

Keep in mind, thicker parts of resin will cure faster than thinner areas, so this trick might not apply to pieces with a lot of varying surface depth.

Pasted Graphic 2

Disclaimer: These top tips have been posted here without the expressed permission of Volpin (AKA Harrison Krix). If you would like to view more of Volpin’s work, his website is http://www.volpinprops.com and don’t forget to check out is Facebook Page to keep up to date with his ongoing projects. Harrison, if you’re reading this and you would like these removed, please get in touch.
Comments

Volpin's Top Tip #2 - Pebbled Rubbery Effect

for a pebbled rubbery "grip" texture on things like gun handles, a basecoat of Rustoleum Multicolored textured paint followed with a topcoat of flat black works great and is very durable on a prop that will see a lot of use.

Pasted Graphic 1

Disclaimer: These top tips have been posted here without the expressed permission of Volpin (AKA Harrison Krix). If you would like to view more of Volpin’s work, his website is http://www.volpinprops.com and don’t forget to check out is Facebook Page to keep up to date with his ongoing projects. Harrison, if you’re reading this and you would like these removed, please get in touch.
Comments

Volpin's Top Tip #1 - Commercial Spray Paints for Airbrushing

If you like the color in a commercial brand spraypaint but the nozzle sputters and spits, turn the can upside down and clamp the nozzle to release all the propellant. Once it's depressurized you can drill a couple holes in the can and dump out all the paint inside for use in an airbrush. Much finer spray pattern and easier to control as well.

Make sure to drill two holes - one to pour and one to vent - and store your paint in an airtight container. NEVER DRILL INTO A PRESSURIZED CAN!

Pasted Graphic

Disclaimer: These top tips have been posted here without the expressed permission of Volpin (AKA Harrison Krix). If you would like to view more of Volpin’s work, his website is http://www.volpinprops.com and don’t forget to check out is Facebook Page to keep up to date with his ongoing projects. Harrison, if you’re reading this and you would like these removed, please get in touch.
Comments

Adam Beane - Cx5 Sculpting Material

A Sculpting Revolution

Cx5 is a premium sculpting material designed to replace sculpting clays, finish waxes, and prototyping plastics. It handles like clay when warm, and is hard as plastic when cool. Do all your work, from roughing out a sculpture to adding a high polish, fine details, and machined features, in just the one material. 
http://adambeane.com/cx5/
Comments

What The Flock??

DIY Electrostatic Flocking Machine
http://bit.ly/Pa6SsF

Negative ION Generator Supplier
http://bit.ly/NegIONGen
Comments

Foaming Gelatin Video

Comments

Foaming Gelatin Recipe

Take 100 gram of the gelatine base.

Dissolve 1 teaspoon (5 ml) of Tartaric acid (food stores) in 1 teaspoon (5 ml) sorbitol in a little cup. You should always stay away from using water because it evaporates and makes the pieces less stable. Let the mixture stand for at least a minute.

Melt the gelatine in a big plastic cup (at least 5 dl so it won’t run over the edges later on).
In a microwave oven 100 g will melt in 30-60 seconds.
Once again be careful not to let it boil.

Stir down 1-6 teaspoons (5-30 ml) of white school glue (ex. Elmers in the US) with a plastic spatula or plastic spoon.
This type of glue is vinyl based and will help the bubbles from breaking down.
This will make the gelatine to be more stable and not collapse after cooling down.
The more glue you use the more stable it will get but it will also get harder and less elastic.
You will have to experiment to find a good mix for your purposes.

The reason why you should only use plastic tools is that cold metal tools inhibit the foaming process.

Now add the tartaric acid mix and stir quickly.

Now add 1 teaspoon (5 ml) Bicarbonate (food stores) and again stir quickly.

Now magic is happening! Let the mix rise for a while without stirring it. 30 seconds usually works fine..

The gelatine is foaming because the mix of tartaric acid and bicarbonate in combination with the heat produces carbondioxid (the same gas as you exhale).

The foam now needs to be refined for about a minute by slowly stirring before you use it in a mould or directly on skin.
If it cools of to much during the process you can reheat it in the microwave for a couple of seconds
Comments